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Tips for Reviewing a Website’s Usability

By Nathan Blake |2/15/17

Following up on our previous blog post, this week we will explore how usability reviewers analyze health websites while also providing some tips for becoming a more informed web user.

HealthWeb Navigator’s content reviews and usability reviews are distinct but complementary. Whereas a content review analyzes what information is provided (its accuracy, completeness, currency, depth, etc.), user-experience reviews are focused on how information is provided; that is, whether or not the presentation and organization of material, in your opinion, is easy to use and navigate, visually appealing, readable, widely understandable, speedy, and geared toward its audience appropriately.

Reviewers should always include direct evidence from the website to support any judgment made about a website’s usability.

Below you will find some specific tips for using your web experience as you review a health website’s usability. Due to time and space constraints, you won’t be able to touch on each one of these aspects in your review, but we hope that they can guide you to think more critically about a website so as to be a stronger resource for consumers.

Evaluating a Website’s Usability

A usability expert for HealthWeb Navigator should be prepared to:

Scan the pageReviews of usability should take visual appeal into account. Design is often unconsciously linked to credibility, and though a website’s credibility doesn’t necessarily hinge on its appearance, it does play a part. Let your eyes wander around the page; where’s the first place you look? What does your instinct prompt you to click on first? Do advertisement obstruct navigation, or is the focus directed toward content? Is the content well-organized? Do the colors or font make it difficult to read the type? How about pop-ups? Answering these questions will train your eye to slow down and analyze what it’s seeing. They will also help you determine whether or not the website is effectively designed, allowing you to articulate what could be done to create a more pleasant user-experience.

TIPPut down in writing or speak aloud your initial impressions about the layout of the page and what you think of the colors, graphics, photos, etc. Is it on par with other websites, or is it better or worse than you expected? What can the website do to catch the reader’s eye, and where does it excel at grabbing your attention?

Take the wheel. Think of each website as a vehicle for disseminating information. Each has a different design, yet there are widely shared features such as navigational schemes, search options, editorial disclaimers, etc. Some websites have site-wide search bars, while others only allow users to click links when searching for material. Usability reviewers should try to understand how the site functions and whether or not it’s easy to “drive,” testing out its various components before casting judgment. Is the website easy to use, and can you find what you are looking for? What’s the loading speed of individual pages? Are there any dead links? Can you get around the website intuitively, or does it have you spinning in circles?

TIP: An easy way to focus on a website’s functionality is to disregard the actual content on the page. Play with the website and test out as many of its features as you can, which often helps reviewers discover user-experience issues. It can also be helpful to search for a specific topic that falls under the website’s scope, testing out the various organizational schemes to determine if the site is user-friendly.

Identify the audience(s) and purpose. All texts presume an audience and a purpose, and it is the job of the reviewer to understand those potential audiences and purposes implied by a given web resource. Start with the idea that all writers, consciously or unconsciously, have an ideal audience in mind when they write, and with that knowledge they determine the shape, form, and scope of the ensuing content. The important concept to understand is that readers and listeners will vary in how much they know about the health information being offered, and websites will vary in what they want to accomplish. Some websites listed on HealthWeb Navigator have very little interest in providing medical content. Some are strictly focused on providing social media capabilities, others act as advocates on behalf of patients, and others simply list resources. Identifying these varying purposes can help you understand if the website successfully meets its goals or not.

TIP: Approach each website as an educator: If you had to give the website a grade, from A to F, what grade would you give it and why? What audiences does the website exclude and how? Is material offered in multiple languages, and it is accessible for people with disabilities? What’s the site’s purpose; is it to inform or persuade, describe or convince, define or influence, review or argue, notify or recommend, instruct or change, advise or advocate, illustrate or support?

Paraphrase information. A paraphrase is a restatement of an idea into your own words. Part of a usability reviewer’s duties involves assessing a site’s understandability, how easy it is to read and follow. One quick way to determine whether or not a website is easy to read is to try and summarize material after reading. Imagine teaching the content to someone else. Can you articulate the material’s substance, or are you floundering for meaning? If you find it easy to paraphrase a website’s content, especially as a layperson, then chances are the site is written clearly. If not, try to hone in on what makes the website difficult to understand and mention that in your review.

TIP: Think about how to articulate information in your own words. Of course some of the more clinical concepts will be difficult to summarize without using the resource’s exact language, but you should at least understand the gist of what is being said. Read over a page, look away from the website, and then write down or speak aloud the essential meaning. If you find this difficult, then the website may have a readability issue.

We hope that these tips and reminders will help you better assess a website’s value and give you a peek behind the scenes of our usability review process. Check back to our previous blog post that focuses on how our volunteers conduct content reviews.

Finally, if you are a web user and are interested in a becoming a usability reviewer for HealthWeb Navigator, please visit the following link to sign up as a volunteer: Becoming a Usability Reviewer.

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