Category: Addiction & Substance Abuse

Having trouble finding reliable health information? Our medical professionals can do it for you.

By Nathan Blake | 11/14/18
Project Manager, HealthWeb Navigator

Readers sometimes ask what a typical day looks like here at HealthWeb Navigator.

Mostly we spend a lot of time browsing the web. Whether it’s groundbreaking medical research, user reviews of a diabetes smartphone app, or a new website that helps you understand your health insurance plan, we try to stay on top of everything health-related the internet has to offer.

Our tireless web browsing has helped us become one of the internet’s leading resources for finding and evaluating reliable healthcare websites. We are, to date, the only place that publishes in-depth reviews of health websites written by actual health experts. Yet we’re still on the lookout for innovative and helpful ways to meet your healthcare research needs.

That’s why we’re excited to announce a new service that gathers the web’s best health information specific to your needs or interests. Yep — we’ll check every nook and cranny to give you personalized resources from the internet’s most trusted sources. No more wondering if what you’re reading is credible. We pre-screen every resource for reliability and only send you the cream of the crop.

Start by shooting us an email at info@healthwebnav.org. Fill us in on the details — what topic you want to learn about, your preferred language and medium, the level of detail you’re comfortable with, etc. — and we’ll respond with relevant, trustworthy resources that specifically meet your preferences.

Maybe you want a Spanish-language video that introduces type 1 diabetes. Or perhaps you’re looking for clinical trials for new a Parkinson’s disease drug treatment. You might even like to know the side effects of your wife’s chemotherapy, or if there’s a support group for teens with cystic fibrosis, or where to download a podcast for caregivers. Whatever the case, we’ll see what’s out there.

We can’t guarantee that we’ll find something you haven’t seen already. And nothing we send you can substitute for medical advice. But no matter what, you’ll walk away with credible and up-to-date information that has been verified by at least one medical professional.

So what are you waiting for? Send us an email and get started today!

Free Health Research Worksheet for Patients

By Nathan Blake | 7/27/18
Project Manager, HealthWeb Navigator

Our team of medical reviewers talk with countless patients about health information on the internet. But many more patients don’t mention what they read online. Either they’re afraid the doctor will ignore them, or will think they’re being “difficult” for talking about what they learned, or they just don’t have time to bring it up.

Doctors and patients need to talk openly about what patients are reading. Browsing the web before and after a doctor’s appointment is something most of us do, as it lets us participate in healthcare decisions. But a doctor’s medical training can help us avoid dangerous or irrelevant advice. And if doctors refuse to listen to what patients have read, or if patients are afraid to speak up, then everyone misses out on valuable insights.

That’s why we’re providing this free resource to help you collect your thoughts before meeting with a healthcare professional. As you research health topics on the internet, use this worksheet to write down what you want to talk about with your doctor.

Make sure you’re clear from the start of your next appointment what you want to discuss and why it’s important to you. Then, let your doctor respond, and write down their thoughts too. Together, you can come to a decision about what to do next.

And don’t forget to browse our collection of reviews to find the most reliable health websites available today!

Download file: Health Research Worksheet

HealthWeb-Navigator-Health-Research-Worksheet

 

E-Cigarettes — Helpful, Risky, or Both?

By Mark A. Kelley, MD |4/9/18
Founder, HealthWeb Navigator

Walking down the street, sometimes I see people who appear to be strolling in a cloud. These folks are wrapped in vapor they inhale from e-cigarettes — a practice called vaping.

Vaping devices first emerged in the late 1990s. They feature a battery-powered heating element that heats up liquid nicotine to create an aerosol, which is free from the toxic byproducts of cigarette combustion. In theory, this device could make it easier and safer for smokers to kick the habit.

As a pulmonary physician, I wince when I hear about people voluntarily inhaling any foreign substance. We are already exposed to more environmental toxins than we realize, and adding something else seems unwise. However, quitting smoking is extremely difficult. Most remedies have been only slightly effective at best. Could vaping help?

After a decade or more of scientific studies, we know a few facts about e-cigarettes, although many questions still remain. Here are the key points:

1. The e-cigarette market is growing. Several studies have shown that between 2010-2013, the use of these devices had more than tripled to include 7% of the U.S. population. Most users are young and/or former smokers. About one-third have never smoked before. Nicotine is highly addictive which is why smokers have difficulty stopping. Vaping is popular among high school students, and their teachers fear that this will lead to cigarette smoking and other addictive habits.

This effect has been observed in a few studies but the trend is unclear. In 2015, the e-cigarette use rate among high school students declined from 16% to 11%. However, there is some evidence that e-cigarette use in high school students is a risk for taking up cigarette smoking.

2. E-cigarettes are safer than regular cigarettes. Both e-cigarette vapor and cigarette smoke contain nicotine, but only cigarette smoke has the harmful products of tobacco combustion. For that reason, most experts consider the e-cigarette to be safer than a regular tobacco cigarettes. However, in both cases, inhaled nicotine stimulates the cardiovascular system. It is unknown whether this effect has long-term consequences such as heart disease or hypertension.

3. E-cigarettes may help smokers quit — but the effect is small. The vast majority of e-cigarette users are current or former smokers. Based on research surveys, these patients are either trying to quit smoking or at least reduce their cigarette consumption. Many studies have compared e-cigarettes to other methods of smoking cessation such as nicotine patches, counseling etc. These studies have been inconclusive. A panel of experts recently suggested that e-cigarettes may slightly improve smoking cessation but the magnitude of the effect is small.

4. It’s too early to know all the risks of using e-cigarettes. These devices expose the user to liquid nicotine and chemicals that create the vapor. The chemicals involved with vaping — propylene glycol and glycerol — when heated, are known to produce carcinogens and compounds that irritate the airways. The exact risk from this exposure is currently unknown, though it is thought to be much lower than that of a regular cigarette. Therefore, for a smoker, switching to the lower risk e-cigarette is a good trade-off. But for non-smokers, using an e-cigarette introduces potential risk for lung disease and cancer. Outbreaks of asthma have already been reported in association with vaping.

5. E-Cigarettes are regulated differently around the world. The World Health Organization has called for strict regulatory control of e-cigarettes by keeping them away from non-smokers and minors. Some countries have banned the devices altogether.

In the U.S, many initially opposed these devices, presuming that they would lead to an increase in cigarette smoking. Some of this fervor has died down and is now focused on minors. At the moment, most states prohibit the sale of e-cigarettes to minors — the same policy as for cigarettes.

The FDA’s new director, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, has taken a fresh approach this problem. The FDA has established a program to fight nicotine addiction by reducing levels in tobacco and other products. Included in this mandate is continued surveillance of the safety and public health effects of e-cigarettes.

If this program is implemented, the role of e-cigarettes in public health may become clear. Ideally, e-cigarettes will rescue smokers from their habit — without recruiting new ones.

Of course the e-cigarette industry has other plans. Although some vaping devices carry a hefty price tag, overall vaping is relatively cheap and safer than cigarettes to boot. The industry is using those facts to leverage the market. Analysts predict that the vaping industry will see annual growth of 20% over the next decade with worldwide revenues of $50 billion by the next decade.  Most of those dollars will come from the industry’s best customers — Americans and Europeans.

If vaping becomes widely used, we may learn that it is safe. But we can’t rule out the opposite outcome either. Widespread vaping across large populations may introduce us to new diseases that could have been prevented.

There is a high cost for ignoring such potential risks. Just ask any patient who has suffered from the toxic effects of asbestos, second-hand smoke, or radon exposure.

Are the Health Risks of Smoking Reversible?

By Mark A. Kelley, MD |09/07/16

As a lung specialist, I am often asked whether the body can recover from many years of smoking.  Based on decades of research, the answer is a resounding “Yes” … but only if you quit smoking – completely.

What Are The Risks of Smoking?

Cigarette smoking kills over 400,000 Americans each year – more than the combined deaths from alcohol, illegal drug use, homicide, suicide, car accidents, and AIDS combined.

Cancer – Before cigarette smoking became widespread in the twentieth century, lung cancer was a rare disease. However, as smoking become popular, lung cancer rose to became a leading cause of death.  Scientific research demonstrated that the toxic chemicals in cigarette smoke are carcinogenic. Smoking is also associated with cancers of the throat and digestive tract.

Heart and Vascular Disease – there is a strong association between smoking and the development of atherosclerosis, the “hardening of the arteries” that causes heart attacks, strokes and aneurysms. These conditions are among the major causes of death in smokers. A heart attack is 2-4 times more likely in a smoker than a non-smoker. Quitting smoking is the single most effective way to reduce the risk of a future heart attack.

Lung Injury and COPD – A person’s first puff from a cigarette invariably causes coughing.   This is the body’s warning sign–inhaled smoke damages the lung. Cigarette smoke irritates the lung’s bronchial tubes, causing mucus production.  The smoke also paralyzes the cells that clear mucus and debris out of the lung. . Over time, cigarette smoke causes mucus plugging, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of the bronchial tubes. This makes the lung more vulnerable to infections. When bronchial tubes are blocked or distorted, it is also much harder to move air in and out of the lung. This condition, called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is a leading cause of death and disability.

Nicotine Addiction – Nicotine is one of the most addictive substances known — often compared to heroin.  Nicotine withdrawal produces symptoms similar to opiates, which is why is it so difficult to quit smoking, Cigarette smoke delivers nicotine immediately to brain areas associated with pleasurable sensations. Nicotine also increases heart rate and blood pressure, and constricts blood vessels. This puts strain on the heart and promotes vascular disease..

If You Quit Smoking, Health Risks Fall Dramatically. 

Cancer – Smoking cessation for 10 years cuts the risk of lung cancer in half.  The reason is that the lung is no longer exposed to the carcinogens in cigarette smoke. With continued abstinence from smoking, the risk continues to decline. Similar results have been seen with laryngeal and other forms of cancer.

Heart and Vascular Disease – For someone with known coronary artery disease (CAD), smoking cession reduces the risk of a future cardiac event by 50%. For someone without CAD, quitting smoking for one year reduces the risk of CAD by 50%. If abstinence continues for 15 years, the risk of future heart events is almost the same as a lifetime non-smoker. The same is true for the risk of stroke.

COPD – Smokers expose their lungs to the constant irritation of cigarette smoke, and have a faster decline in lung function than non-smokers.   This decline occurs slowly and is not noticeable until the lung function is so low that it affects everyday activity. At that point, smoking cessation will reduce lung irritation but the chronically diseased lung cannot repair years of damage. The best strategy is to stop smoking before significant damage has occurred. The good news is smoking cessation can halt the rapid decline in lung function before more damage occurs.

Nicotine Addiction – Most smokers want to quit smoking but nicotine withdrawal is a major obstacle. As the old saying goes, “if it were easy, everyone would do it”. Most smokers who try to quit fail multiple times. However, the encouraging statistic is that millions of Americans have kicked the habit. The best results come from planned programs to break the nicotine addiction and eliminate lifestyle habits associated with smoking. (see references below)

In summary, smoking has life-threatening health care risks. Once a person stops smoking, these risks decline significantly over time. While kicking the habit is challenging, the health benefits are enormous. It is never too late to quit.

For more information about smoking and health risks, see the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Lung Association.

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