Category: Safety & Emergencies

Friday Giveaway – Free Health Research Worksheet for Patients

By Nathan Blake | 7/27/18
Project Manager, HealthWeb Navigator

Our team of medical reviewers talk with countless patients about health information on the internet. But many more patients don’t mention what they read online. Either they’re afraid the doctor will ignore them, or will think they’re being “difficult” for talking about what they learned, or they just don’t have time to bring it up.

Doctors and patients need to talk openly about what patients are reading. Browsing the web before and after a doctor’s appointment is something most of us do, as it lets us participate in healthcare decisions. But a doctor’s medical training can help us avoid dangerous or irrelevant advice. And if doctors refuse to listen to what patients have read, or if patients are afraid to speak up, then everyone misses out on valuable insights.

That’s why we’re providing this free resource to help you collect your thoughts before meeting with a healthcare professional. As you research health topics on the internet, use this worksheet to write down what you want to talk about with your doctor.

Make sure you’re clear from the start of your next appointment what you want to discuss and why it’s important to you. Then, let your doctor respond, and write down their thoughts too. Together, you can come to a decision about what to do next.

And don’t forget to browse our collection of reviews to find the most reliable health websites available today!

Download file: Health Research Worksheet

HealthWeb-Navigator-Health-Research-Worksheet

 

Radiology Imaging Tests: The Basics

By Carla Dellaporta |12/8/17
Director of Education, NeedyMeds

You’re out walking your dog, enjoying the fresh air and holiday decorations, when suddenly — bam! Down you go on a patch of black ice. Standing, you realize you can’t put weight on your ankle.

The doctor says she’s not quite sure how bad the damage is. To get a better idea, she wants to schedule what she calls a “radiology imaging test.”

Say what now? Isn’t radiology like, nuclear?

Medical jargon gets thrown around left and right these days. Thankfully this one’s pretty simple. “Radiology” is the branch of medicine that relies on technology to diagnose or treat diseases. And “imaging” means the technology involved to take pictures inside your body.

So your doctor is saying she needs to get a better picture—literally—of what’s going on inside you.

There are many radiology tests out there. They differ in terms of the technologies used to produce images of your body. Some common radiology tests requested by doctors include:

X-ray: Uses a small dose of radiation.

CT scan: Combines multiple X-ray images.

Ultrasound: Uses high frequency sound waves.

MRI: Uses magnetic fields and radio waves.

From 2000-2010, imaging services and costs grew at twice the rate of other healthcare technologies. One reason why may be what’s called “defensive medicine.” This term refers to doctors prescribing or recommending unnecessary tests to protect themselves from potential malpractice lawsuits.

A recent study estimated that unnecessary medical tests cost the U.S. nearly $7 billion dollars annually. Overly cautious medicine is a common practice that, unfortunately, comes at the patient’s expense. Don’t rush to get a test without having a clear idea of what your options are and whether or not you can afford treatment.

Below, we’ll cover some questions to ask before scheduling your radiology imaging test. That way you’ll know you’re getting the best bang for your buck.

Questions to Ask Your Doctor Before Scheduling the Test

Do I need this test? You’ll want to understand why you need a scan and how the results will change your course of treatment. If the doctor can’t justify how the results of the test would change the treatment course, then you probably can do without it. No use in wasting time or money on unnecessary tests.

Are there safer alternatives? A CT scan exposes you to much more radiation than a standard X-ray. An MRI, on the other hand, doesn’t use radiation at all. Because radiation can potentially cause DNA damage, you want to limit your long-term exposure. Ask whether there are any lower-radiation but still effective options.

How much will this test cost? Imaging fees vary widely between hospitals, private facilities, geographic location, etc. Always ask for the bottom line cost before scheduling a test. Keep in mind, there’s something called a “global fee” you’ll want to be aware of. This fee charges for the test itself as well as the professional interpretation of the results. Being aware of the global fee ensures you won’t be blindsided when the bill arrives.

How long before I get the results? Radiology test results are generally read on-site by a trained radiologist. However, it’s the doctor who usually delivers those results to the patient, and a variety of factors will influence when you’ll receive them. Ease your mind by asking up front how long this process will take. Consider calling if you haven’t received your test results after five days.

Some Final Cost-Saving Tips

Confirm which location(s) your health insurer considers in-network and how much they cover. Few people know that most of the time, imaging tests cost more when performed at a hospital rather than private facility. Contact your health insurance company directly to find out which facilities they consider in-network. By staying in-network, you won’t have to pay the for the full price of care. There’s a reason you have health insurance—let your insurer help cover the costs!

Ask for a cash discount or sliding scale payment plan. Paying out-of-pocket doesn’t mean you’re doomed to pay up-front and in-full. Most healthcare centers will work with your financial situation, but first you have to ask. A payment plan is a much more reasonable choice compared to putting the total fee on a credit card. You wind up paying a lot more money in interest if you can’t pay off your credit card bill immediately.

Check the credentials of the imaging facility. You know you can trust a facility if it’s been accredited by the American College of Radiology. That means the center has undergone a rigorous evaluation process led by experts in the imaging field. Generally, accreditation can tell you if the center’s radiologists are experienced, and whether or not the center’s equipment and staff meet/exceed nationally accepted standards. Obviously you want the best care for your money.

To learn more about the field of radiology imaging, our reviewers recommend RadiologyInfo.org as a great introductory resource. This website explains the various forms of medical imaging including their indications, complications, and relevant tips for patients undergoing tests. Read our full review for more information.

Firearm Fatalities – What Are the Issues?

By Mark A. Kelley, MD |6/22/17

The recent shooting at a Congressional baseball practice is another example of firearm violence. When such crimes grab headlines, it is helpful to review the national statistics concerning guns and safety.

According the Centers for Disease Control, 33,000 Americans die from gun injuries annually. About 65% of these deaths are from suicides. Easy access to firearms, especially in the home, is associated with higher rates of suicide.

Because self-inflicted gun injuries are highly lethal, most suicide attempts by this method are successful. However, patients with unsuccessful suicide attempts rarely succumb to suicide later. Therefore, keeping these patients away from guns is life-saving.

The second major cause of firearm death is homicides (33%). Nearly all of these deaths are in the home or among people who know one another. Random shooting fatalities are rare.

The final cause of firearm deaths is accidental shootings, usually in the home, and often involving children. These deaths account for 2% of firearm fatalities.

Mass shootings, such as at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, are heart-breaking tragedies. From 2007-2016, the national fatalities per year from mass shootings ranged from eight to 67 victims. Over that decade, the nation averaged 38 deaths per year, or 0.3% of the total gun-related homicides.

Firearm mortality statistics can be summarized as follows:

• The majority of Americans who die from gunshot wounds are the victims of suicide.

• Most other fatalities are due to domestic violence or among people who know one another.

• Mass shootings, while dramatic, are a very small part of this problem.

In all these scenarios, easy access to firearms increases the likelihood of a fatal outcome.

Mass shootings are a relatively new phenomenon in our country. Many hypotheses have been raised to explain this change. Among them are the expansion of social and news media, the availability of automatic weapons, and weak gun control laws.

These who commit these crimes share some common characteristics. In many cases, they do not know their victims. Most of the perpetrators act alone, have no plans for escape, and die violently, often by their own hand. Many obtain firearms legally.

Why motivates such people? Psychologists have suggested that this violence stems from rage at society because of some grievance. The result of this anger is mass casualties and usually the shooter’s own death by gunfire, often self-inflicted.

This raises several issues. Are mass shootings a form of public suicide? If so, will they occur more often? While no one has the answers, one fact is clear. The behavior behind these shootings is highly abnormal and suggests serious mental health problems as the root cause of the violence.

Our society has two problems that are closely linked—lethal weapons and mental health. Those with mental health issues and violent intent are more likely to harm themselves or others if they have access to guns. However, gun control is only a partial solution.

The major challenge is early recognition and treatment of mental illness. We need to help mentally ill patients well before their depression or rage reaches the breaking point.

Our elected officials are now considering cuts to healthcare benefits, particularly in mental health. Such cuts would be a major public policy mistake. In this era of gun violence, public safety requires that we make mental health one of our top priorities.

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